A Little Taste 3

Posted: July 17, 2015 in Uncategorized

Misanthrope

This is from Misanthrope – a short story included in my collection set to be published this year (The Fall of Icarus).

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My Biggest Fear

Posted: June 26, 2015 in Uncategorized

Poets often talk about peering into the darkness or they’ll mention something deep about their souls – the dark and disturbed poets do, anyway. Cheerful poetry hardly sells.

All I know is that I could live alone, but I don’t want to. I’ve always known I’ve wanted to fall in love, grow old with someone, and share every secret I’ve ever had just so that I can tell that person: you know everything. But that wouldn’t be the end. We’d grow and we’d continue to share. It’s not enough to say we’d share one soul (there’s that reference), I want to say that we’d both place everything we are into each other’s hands without fear, anxiety, worry – we’d just do it and do so freely.

What scares me most is doing this, then growing old, and then dying to leave her here or her dying to leave me here simply because neither of us would know how to exist without the other. That’s not dependency (some would argue that’s the definition), it’s love. Then, we’d be told by friends and family to “remember the good times,” but I won’t want to – I’d want the real thing. I’d want to continue making memories that I’ll never have to relive just to remember her or for her to remember me. If she were to go first, I’d literally stand there peering into the darkness – into nothing – making no attempt to recapture my soul because it’d be useless – she’d be gone.

That is my biggest fear. It keeps me up at night and made me hesitate to meet her.

But I did.

A Little Taste 2

Posted: April 24, 2015 in Uncategorized

For Walter

This is another snapshot of a short story entitled For Walter.
It will be included in the collection of short stories (The Fall of Icarus) set to be published this summer.

A Little Taste

Posted: February 5, 2015 in Uncategorized

Woods

This summer I plan to finish up my short stories and publish them in a collection entitled, The Fall of Icarus.

Pictured above is a very small snapshot of one of the stories entitled, Woods.

Being Good and Individualism

Posted: February 5, 2015 in Education, Humanity

still_giveempickle

*The above photo is the name of a book I had to read when I was the Assistant Manager of the campus nightclub at University. Bob Farrell is the author of this text designed to teach employees (specifically those in the service industry) how to simply be an effective employee and a leader*

Recently, I asked my grade 11 students whether or not it’s important to be a good person. It was nice to see that none of them said it wasn’t important, and the responses (if I may say) were not at all shocking. According to my students, it is important to be a good person because it makes you feel good; it can create a positive change in the world; it makes others feel good; it can help you gain respect; it makes Christ happy (for those that have a Christian lens); and it can make it easier for you to exist as a part of society (both local and global). These responses were exactly what I was looking for and it was nice to see young minds having such a positive outlook on being a generally good person.

I should also mention that this particular group of grade 11’s are quite bright and many of them are leaders in their own way – hence why I expected their shared responses. They are a very keen group who are willing to learn, can show respect for themselves and others, and they know when to have fun, but also know when to do their work – trust me when I say that this isn’t classroom-specific, but their grade in general. So, we spoke about being “good.” I then asked them, “As a rather solid group of grade 11’s, do you have a social and academic responsibility to set an example and contribute to how the school is run? OR, are you fine with being at school as long as your own teacher, your own classes, and your own grades are just fine? Their responses were shocking. The majority of students were fine with the latter…

So, the question then becomes, how are you supposed to be a good person and care about what happens out in the world, when you can’t even care about what happens in your own school?

Bob Farrell, in his book mentioned above, makes something very clear: That sometimes what you do when no one is looking can be more powerful than when you are being watched… This powerful message makes me consider where the source of our motivation comes from in doing good works for others. For example, if a student is walking through the halls of their school and notices a leftover lunch bowl laying around, do they: 1. Walk by it? 2. Pick it up because a teacher is nearby? or 3. Pick it up whether there are people around or not?

There’s no argument, we live in a very individualistic society whereby we look after ourselves and those close to us, but seldom do we venture further past that. I am certainly to blame as well.

How do you teach active citizenship? We have a difficult time reconnecting to each other in a time where the ability to connect is more plausible than ever! How do you teach someone to care? How do we learn to love each other?

TEACH100

Posted: January 21, 2015 in Uncategorized

823

This blog has been officially ranked on TEACH100 (www.teach.com). I’m #823 but hey, you have to start somewhere!

Thank you to all new readers and readers that have checked in every-so-often. I appreciate it.

Banning Energy Drinks

Posted: January 9, 2015 in Education

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I caught the tail end of a news broadcast about making the sale of energy drinks to persons under the age of 19 illegal. This would also mean that vending machines in high school hallways would also be energy drink free. This caused me to assess my own school and what we offer our young minds.

Doctors Nova Scotia are the ones that are pushing for legislation to pass the above law. On their website, they indicate that they have support in this venture from the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) – that’s pretty good support. In a study conducted in Nova Scotia, 50% of grade 7 students admit to using energy drinks in the 12 months prior to being surveyed and this increases to 71% usage by grade 12. Some students (they cite 25%) even mix this with alcohol…surprise surprise. Could it be that living on the east coast ain’t such easy livin’ after all? Are east coasters more wound up than their stereotype depicts? Do these statistics simply show that east coasters are putting in long hours and therefore require the beverage to keep awake? Who knows.

I have a limited connection to energy drinks. They were certainly not popular when I was in high school and Red Bull only became common when I was in University. I worked at a nightclub, so naturally shifts that lasted until 4am required a drink like Red Bull. I never engaged in more than two a night and I’ve never been a fan of mixing it with alcohol…

I can’t say that I am for or against the motion to ban energy drinks, but I’ll say that the benefits of keeping energy drinks in-school don’t seem to outweigh the downsides to it.

Advantages: Energy drinks, obviously, give students a kick in caffeine. Therefore, it may help students to stay alert during class. I’m not too sure how long the kick lasts, so their crash may be worse. The energy drinks are also high in carbs, so for athletes, this may be an advantage for increasing performance. I suppose the last advantage is that by offering the drink, students can make the decision on their own whether the drink is something they’d like to engage in or not.

Downsides: Energy drinks are packed with sugar, which can be both good and bad. The ideal consumption of sugar intake a day is about 37grams and most energy drinks contain about 35grams in one beverage. This high sugar content can lead to obesity. Also, students who do not have good self-control can partake in too many beverages leading to heart issues because of the high-caffeine content. By offering students only healthy drink choices forces students to make the right choice. Too much caffeine can lead to headaches due to caffeine withdrawal and can even lead to insomnia if the beverage is consumed too often.

My school offers no pop or energy drinks in the vending machine nor do they sell it in the cafeteria.

As a fun fact…webmd published an article in 2012 directly linking heart attack, suicide, a miscarriage, vomiting, and psychotic disorders to energy drinks. Is that enough to scare off students from drinking them? Probably not.